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The Key Comprehension Routine
This course provides grades 4-12 educators an opportunity to participate in Keys to Literacy professional development via an online format.

The online course is organized into modules that include interactive activities, reading assignments, quizzes, and video clips from live training. It is designed for use with The Key Comprehension Routine training book. Course participants complete “use your content” activities that allow them to generate lessons that incorporate the instructional practices into classroom instruction using existing content reading and teaching material. Registration for the online course includes a copy of the training book. 

Target Audience: Classroom teachers in grades 4 - 12
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Dates Dates: Rolling access; this course is web-based and self-paced.
Credits Credits: 13.5 Contact Hours
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
This 15 hour course fulfills the requirement that all educators must have 15 PDPs related to English as a Second Language when they re-certify after July 1, 2016. The instructor is a DESE-approved PD provider.

This online 15 PDP ESL course involves 4 (approximately 2-hour) weekly self-paced modules. After finishing the 4 weekly modules, participants will have an additional week to complete the other 7 hours of the course by developing a Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Lesson Plan to synthesize learning from the reading and modules.


How will students analyze complex texts across content areas while we meet their broad range of needs in all educator roles in our K-12 classrooms? Research demonstrates that students greatly benefit from consistent use of graphic organizers. Participants will work with two research-based, visual comprehension strategy tools, top-down webs and two-column notes, to support all our students to comprehend higher-level concepts and to assist ELs to work at a higher level while still building their academic vocabulary. Course topics to be covered include top­-down web and two­-column notes skills and application, Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) strategies, and review of lesson examples aligned with Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Participants will share best practices, plan, and design scaffolded lessons applying top-down web or two-column notes graphic organizers or prerequisite skills that they can implement in the classroom right away- synchronously and asynchronously. The final assignment of the development of a Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Lesson Plan synthesizes the module learning, incorporating course applications and takeaways from online reading.

 

Graduate Credit:  Participants may choose to apply for one graduate credit for an additional fee of $125 to Worcester State University.

 

Target Audience:  K – 12 Teachers

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Dates Dates: This course will run 10/1 - 11/7/20 and requires a final project.
Credits Credits: 15 Contact Hours and 1 Grad Credit
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
This course will include live sessions via Zoom.  Days and times are TBD as they will be based on the availability of participants.

Using a combination of Zoom and the Moodle platform - as well as the actual connection tools recommended for librarians in the course content - this course will encourage structured exploration, team-work and sharing.

Starting with a survey of the range of restrictions and expectations of MA school districts (in the building, not in the building, loaning books, not loaning books, teaching lessons, doing NOTHING!), we’ll expand our vision to include best practice in a flexible and responsive approach to being a school librarian.  Topics will include:


Only Connect
How to relate to students, parents and teachers, reach the opt-outs and avoid irrelevancy.

To Loan or not to Loan

How to set up safe processes, stimulate and satisfy the audience, and optimize electronic sources for the school.

Teacher Connections

They NEED you!! Now more than ever, the internet savvy librarian is an essential asset to the classroom teacher but only if you are pro-active and can connect with them. We will explore how to optimize your connections and set up regular communications that teachers actually use.

Lessons
Rethinking the traditional set of lessons – what’s relevant and what’s not. What new skills do students need to maneuver at a distance? What former skills should be discarded for now? How can you support/embed yourself in classroom work?

New Paradigms
It’s not attendance, it’s accomplishment. It’s not signing on, it’s sending back evidence of engagement!  We will explore how to ensure clarity in developing authentic tasks that can be a strong indication of engagement with learning.


Audience:  K - 12 Librarians


Graduate Credit Option: Participants can choose to apply for one graduate credit through Worcester State University for an additional fee of $125, payable to WSU.


MSLA members are eligible to receive the EDCO member rate. Please email mcswineyctr.org for a discount code before registering to ensure that you will receive the correct rate.

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Dates Dates: Online 10/5 - 11/2/20 - This course will be broken down into (4) weekly modules, approximately 3 hours per week at your own pace.
Credits Credits: 12 Contact Hours and 1 Grad Credit
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:

This course will be held live through zoom. 


School leaders are faced with important decisions every day and how these decisions either perpetuate or interrupt systemic racism can often be missed by leaders at key decision points. This leads to interpersonal and organizational conflict, erosion of trust, and importantly, missed opportunities to advance anti-racism goals and objectives. Through case studies of school leaders wrestling with complex decisions and utilizing the latest frameworks in decision making research and practice, participants will leave with insights and practical tools to help them make better, anti-racist, decisions in their leadership roles. We'll also discuss how other key factors such as communication tactics, stakeholder engagement, crisis management, and opportunity windows influence a leader's decision making capabilities and possibilities.  


Deadline for Registration: September 15, 2020
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Starts Starts: 10/6/2020 3:00 PM
Sessions Sessions: 3
Credits Credits: 6 Contact Hours
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
To register, please contact Dana Mullaley - dmullaley@edcollab.org
Essential Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities to Think Mathematically
This 15 hour online course will provide teachers with 5 research-based strategies to teach students with learning disabilities how to think and reason mathematically.  Final projects are due by December 2nd.

Participants will leave:
  • Understanding what it looks like when students reason mathematically – quantitatively, structurally, and through repetition
  • Knowing 5 essential strategies to engage students, support their development of mathematical thinking, and develop independence
  • Ready to support each and every learner to develop as mathematicians based on their individual learning profiles
Materials:  All students must have a copy of Routines for Reasoning by Kelemanik, Lucenta & Creighton.  It is currently available through Amazon and Heinemann.

Graduate Credit: Participants may choose to apply for 1 graduate credit for an additional fee of $125 payable to Worcester State University.

Target Audience: Grade Level 3 - 8
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Dates Dates: Online October 7 - November 18, 2020; 15 hours - no set times
Credits Credits: 15 Contact Hours and 1 Grad Credit
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
This course will be held live through zoom.

The arts have a long history and unique position of addressing injustice in society. Still, like all organizations and disciplines, art, artists, and teaching-artists are not immune from perpetuating systemic racism. This seminar will look at examples of how racism operates in theatre, music, and visual artsboth the mediums as well as the industries or academic departments in which they operate. We'll look at historic as well as contemporary examples of art interrupting as well as perpetuating racism in the U.S. through recordings, critiques, artifacts, and art itself. The seminar will also address the language we use around the arts and how it has been used to include or exclude and create hierarchies of worth or belonging. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of how race and racism operate in the arts, specific examples of racism in theatre, music, and visual art that they can use in their teaching practice with different age groups/grade levels, practice speaking up and having discussions about race and racism in music, theatre, and art classrooms, and deepen their own consciousness about race and racism in their teaching and art-making practice.

This seminar will include a guest co-facilitator who holds faculty appointments in music at Berklee College of Music and in theatre at Emerson College.

Deadline for Registration: September 30, 2020
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Starts Starts: 10/10/2020 10:00 AM
Sessions Sessions: 3
Credits Credits: 6 Contact Hours
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
To register, please contact Dana Mullaley - dmullaley@edcollab.org

This course will be held live through zoom. 


School leaders are faced with important decisions every day and how these decisions either perpetuate or interrupt systemic racism can often be missed by leaders at key decision points. This leads to interpersonal and organizational conflict, erosion of trust, and importantly, missed opportunities to advance anti-racism goals and objectives. Through case studies of school leaders wrestling with complex decisions and utilizing the latest frameworks in decision making research and practice, participants will leave with insights and practical tools to help them make better, anti-racist, decisions in their leadership roles. We'll also discuss how other key factors such as communication tactics, stakeholder engagement, crisis management, and opportunity windows influence a leader's decision making capabilities and possibilities.  


Deadline for Registration: October 1, 2020
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Starts Starts: 10/15/2020 5:00 PM
Sessions Sessions: 3
Credits Credits: 6 Contact Hours
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
To register, please contact Dana Mullaley - dmullaley@edcollab.org
This course is an IDEAS sponsored event. To register, please contact dmullaley@edcollab.org. Please note that the IDEAS member rate applies after all course slots have been used.

This course will meet live via zoom and is designed to introduce educators to the complex issues raised by race and racism and their impact on student engagement and achievement. This course will provide educators with an understanding of racial identity and the importance of building authentic student teacher relationships. This course will also help educators increase their skills of cultural proficiency.

Please note that this course may be canceled if there are fewer than 12 participants.

Target Audience: K - 12 Educators

Credit Option: Participants may choose to register for 2 graduate credits through Framingham State College for an additional charge of $150 payable to FSU.




Deadline for Registration: September 30, 2020
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Starts Starts: 10/17/2020 8:30 AM
Sessions Sessions: 4
Credits Credits: 25 Contact Hours and 2 Grad Credit
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
To register please contact Dana Mullaley - dmullaley@edcollab.org.
This course is an IDEAS sponsored event. To register, please contact dmullaley@edcollab.org. Please note that the IDEAS member rate applies after all course slots have been used.

This course will meet live via zoom and is designed to introduce educators to the complex issues raised by race and racism and their impact on student engagement and achievement. This course will provide educators with an understanding of racial identity and the importance of building authentic student teacher relationships. This course will also help educators increase their skills of cultural proficiency.

Please note that this course may be canceled if there are fewer than 12 participants.

Target Audience: K - 12 Educators

Credit Option: Participants may choose to register for 2 graduate credits through Framingham State College for an additional charge of $150 payable to FSU.




Deadline for Registration: September 30, 2020
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Starts Starts: 10/19/2020 4:00 PM
Sessions Sessions: 8
Credits Credits: 25 Contact Hours and 2 Grad Credit
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
To register please contact Dana Mullaley - dmullaley@edcollab.org.
This course will be held live via zoom. 

This 12.5-hour course is designed to help administrators understand the inner-workings of cultural proficiency, including examining the impact of racial microaggressions and stereotypes on learning, student engagement, and school culture. School leaders will learn strategies on how to apply these elements to supporting culturally proficient classrooms and school environments, as well as applying the course learning to schools at the institutional level. This class is open to administrators who are currently in a part-time or full-time administrative role.

Graduate Credit: Participants can choose to apply for 1 graduate credit for an additional fee of $75 payable to Framingham State University.

Target Audience: This course is for administrators who are currently in a part-time or full-time administrative role.

Deadline for Registration: October 1, 2020
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Starts Starts: 10/21/2020 4:00 PM
Sessions Sessions: 4
Credits Credits: 12 Contact Hours and 1 Grad Credit
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
To register, please contact Dana Mullaley - dmullaley@edcollab.org.
This workshop will be held live through zoom.

In this anti-racist series of two-hour workshops with pre-meeting assignments, participants will begin to unlearn, and then relearn, the First Nations (Native American) Indigenous story. We will use a critical lens to transform (decolonize) our thinking about teaching practices and curriculum content. Strategies are applicable to all grade levels and subjects, as well as being applicable beyond the Indigenous perspective. The Teaching Tolerance standards of identity, diversity, justice, and action will be incorporated.

Part 1 (Identity, Decolonizing Curriculum)
In Part I, participants will explore racial identity development as it applies to Indigenous people and the multicultural curriculum transformation model developed by James Banks as it applies to the "Thanksgiving.” Participants will practice how to “challenge and change the narrative” to include more multicultural/ multilingual perspectives. Basic vocabulary around anti-racism, decolonization, settler privilege/fragility, and the cycle of oppression/ advantage will be reviewed. The Teaching Tolerance standards of identity and diversity will be applied.

Part 2 (Implicit Bias and Indigenous Contributions)
In Part 2, participants will explore strategies to confront “invisibility” and implicit bias. Participants will practice validating identity through cultural contributions and applying the Community Cultural Wealth model developed by Tara Yasso. Strategies for how to adapt teaching pedagogy to be more culturally responsive and challenge systemic racism and inequities will be presented. The Teaching Tolerance standards of identity and justice will be applied.

Part 3 (Cultural Appropriation and Being an "Ally" to Indigenous Nations)
In Part 3, participants will explore culture, cultural racism, and cultural appropriation referring to the work of Susan Scafidi (Who Owns Culture? Appropriation and Authenticity) and Zaretta Hammond (Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain). Strategies for how to begin to be a social change agent (ally, co-conspirator, accomplice) and challenge systemic racism, microaggressions, and inequities will be presented. The difference between assimilation, acculturation, and appreciation will be reviewed. The Teaching Tolerance standards of justice and action will be applied.

Deadline for Registration:  September 30
, 2020
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Starts Starts: 10/22/2020 4:30 PM
Sessions Sessions: 3
Credits Credits: 6 Contact Hours
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
To register, please contact Dana Mullaley - dmullaley@edcollab.org
This course will require 15 hours online, approximately 5 hours per week.


This course satisfies the requirement that all educators must have 15 PDPs related to special education when they re-certify after July 1, 2016.

This course is an introduction to a broad range of topics related to student developmental disabilities, including categories of cognitive, physical, emotional, and learning delays. The inclusion of students into educational environments will be highlighted. Topics will include:
  • History of special education and inclusion 
  • Laws which govern inclusion, IDEA, and the integration of students with disabilities 
  • Family concerns and challenges 
  • Current and future trends and best practices 
  • Specific disability exploration and knowledge through readings documentaries and case study analysis 
  • Best practices in Universal Design for Instruction for students with disabilities and diverse learning styles 
  • Supporting the successful transition to post-secondary environment 
Target Audience: Teachers, Guidance Counselors and Administrators

Graduate Credit:
At the first class, participants may choose to apply for 1 graduate credit for an additional fee of $125 payable to Worcester State University.
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Dates Dates: Online November 2 - November 30, 2020 15 hours
Credits Credits: 15 Contact Hours and 1 Grad Credit
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
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